Scottish Historical Fiction: Witch Wood, The New Road, The Men of Moss-Hags


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S. R. CROCKETT

Stocking, Jr. An initial version, The South Seas , was published as a copyright edition of 22 copies in ; the material was then serialized in in Black and White , the New York Sun , and the Auckland Star. In the South Seas , a compilation selected and edited by Sidney Colvin, first appeared in volume form in Swearingen, Writings , — Citations are to In the South Seas , ed. Neil Rennie London: Penguin, Yeazell, ed.


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Edwin M. Susan R. Paul Binding London: Penguin, , Veitch, History , Storch, ed. Personalised recommendations. Cite chapter How to cite? ENW EndNote. Crow transformations were rare elsewhere, though there was much other folklore about them: S. Thompson ed.

Normand and Roberts eds , Witchcraft, RPC, 2nd ser. Craigie Scottish Text Society, , 51—2; cf. Normand and Roberts eds , Witchcraft, Daemonologie, Book 3, ch. On second sight, see M. Records of the Kirk of Scotland … from the year downwards, ed.

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Peterkin Edinburgh, , Yeoman, SHS Miscellany, xiii , —6, —4, —5. HP, iii, For more on Scottish possession cases, most of which occurred very late, see B. Levack ed. London, , i, — Macdonald, Witches of Fife, —1.

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SJC, iii, Larner, Enemies of God, —6. Normand and Roberts eds , Witchcraft, Daemonologie, Book 2, ch. It is unlikely to have come from Denmark. See P. Odense, , i, —9. RPC, xiv, He aimed to discourage witchcraft prosecution by banning arrests of suspects not caught doing these things, but this remains a credible account of what his colleagues thought witches might do.

WITCH WOOD

See M. Patrick Lowrie Dundonald, : Pitcairn ed. Anderson, PSAS, 22 —8 , —62, at p. Summers London, , III. Briggs, Witches and Neighbours, 25— There was one highly unusual case in Lorraine when a witch confessed to having disinterred the corpse of a child she had killed: ibid.

Scottish Historical Fiction

For a case from Savoy mentioning exhumation see H. Lea, Materials Toward a History of Witchcraft, 3 vols. Howland New York, , i, But of Essex cases, only one involved exhumation: A. Thorndike, Michael Scot London, , ch. Scot was learned in magic but may not have practised it. Scottish philosophers were largely concerned with questions of logic, in which they were all fundamentally dependent on Aristotle: A. MacQueen ed. For necromancy as a particular concern of the witchcraft act see J. Thomson Bannatyne Club, , Cowan and D. I am grateful to Dr Louise Yeoman for this reference. Briggs, Witches and Neighbours, —2.

Briggs, Witches and Neighbours, , Bartlett ed. The data can be viewed and studied either through online web interfaces with searching, graphing and mapping capabilities or by downloading the full database. I The Survey was fortunate that two previous projects, by George F. Larner, Lee and McLachlan surveyed legal sources that were produced centrally and held in the National Archives of Scotland, including the books of adjournal, circuit court books and printed privy council and parliamentary records.

They did not use manuscript church records. All the primary legal material, including more of the unsorted process papers, as well as all the central material, was resurveyed. It was felt, however, that it would be less useful to resurvey all the printed primary and secondary sources, as these are relatively easy for other researchers to locate. That said, many documents did not survive and those that have survived do not necessarily tell us all that we would like to know. Most of the missing documentation relates to local aspects of witchcraft accusation and prosecution; thus surviving documents are heavily skewed towards centrally produced and kept records.

The information contained in the surviving documentation ranges from simply a record of the name of a suspect and date of an accusation to an extremely rich and detailed dossier from many different types of sources with extensive locally and centrally produced documents. Central sources particularly the privy council minutes show that trials were authorised, but local trial documents themselves, or other indications that a local trial actually took place, seldom survive. In order to ameliorate some of these problems we built three searching tools into the database that allow users to create subsets of cases.

By excluding these, a subset of well-documented cases can be created and analysed. Of course, researchers using the database will need to determine whether this well-documented subset is indicative of the total population of cases. Lauren Martin and Joyce Miller 53 We believe that in many ways it is not.

Witchcraft and Superstitious Record in the South-Western District of Scotland | Witchcraft | Ghosts

The well-documented cases tend to be those tried in the court of justiciary in Edinburgh or the circuit courts, whereas most witchcraft suspects were tried in the locality with a commission of justiciary from the central government. That is one reason why we created a second tool for database users to create additional subsets of suspects based on trial process venue: central or local trial. II Understanding the data recorded in the Survey requires some structural explanation of the database.

The Survey database was developed to record both quantitative and qualitative information, and was primarily structured around the accused witchcraft suspect, including personal and family biographical material. The next level of information recorded for each accused person, the case material, included details about people involved in the investigation process, the trial process and trial, beings and meetings, folk culture, disease and damage and any other charges. The trial process was divided into pre-trial actions, including investigative actions or commissions; the trial itself, either local or central; and post-trial events or outcomes.

Alternatively, an individual might have been mentioned by another person but did not appear in any investigation or trial themselves. The section on folk culture allowed the project to record information about fairyland, the use of sympathetic magic, physical and verbal rituals, white magic, calendar customs, religious motifs and shape changing.

Scottish Witchcraft: Background and Practices

A reference to the good neighbours, or a woman in a green kirtle, was recorded as a fairy motif. Religious motifs such as the Trinity or Christian prayers, crosses or holy wells were also recorded. As disease and damage were usually perceived as the intended outcomes of demonic witchcraft it was logical to include a section where this could be recorded.

This meant that the Survey was able to note outcomes such as human illness or death, animal illness or death, infertility, impotence, transferring or laying on and taking off of disease, any harm, and poisoning. Damage or harm to property such as loss of milk or dairy products, failure of crops, failure of brewing or loss of ships was noted.

The project also recorded how many of the accused might have been involved in curing or healing disease. Any mention of healing humans and animals was noted, as were references to midwifery. In this section it was also noted if the accused had given any reason for their malice, including revenge, debt, failed business interaction, social slight or refusal of alms.

Scottish Historical Fiction: Witch Wood, The New Road, The Men of Moss-Hags Scottish Historical Fiction: Witch Wood, The New Road, The Men of Moss-Hags
Scottish Historical Fiction: Witch Wood, The New Road, The Men of Moss-Hags Scottish Historical Fiction: Witch Wood, The New Road, The Men of Moss-Hags
Scottish Historical Fiction: Witch Wood, The New Road, The Men of Moss-Hags Scottish Historical Fiction: Witch Wood, The New Road, The Men of Moss-Hags
Scottish Historical Fiction: Witch Wood, The New Road, The Men of Moss-Hags Scottish Historical Fiction: Witch Wood, The New Road, The Men of Moss-Hags
Scottish Historical Fiction: Witch Wood, The New Road, The Men of Moss-Hags Scottish Historical Fiction: Witch Wood, The New Road, The Men of Moss-Hags

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